Non-Fiction

6 Things I Wish I Knew Before Pursuing Acting

Acting can be such an enjoyable thing to be involved in. From the local theater to worldwide films, the experiences that come along with acting can be extremely memorable. Truly amazing things can come out of creating a hobby or pursuing a career in entertainment, however, it isn’t all what most would expect. As someone who has recently entered the world of acting, I’d like to share the things I wish I knew ahead of time.

 

  1. Rejection is okay! Every actor or actress will experience rejection at one point or another, and that’s okay! Rejection doesn’t mean that you weren’t good enough. It simply means the casting management didn’t feel that you were the best fit for the part they were hiring for. Don’t let this discourage you! You might not be right for this role, but there is a good possibility that you could fit perfectly for another. Use these experiences to grow through feedback and criticism.
  2. Give it time. Becoming successful in anything takes time and effort, and you can’t expect any different from acting. It won’t happen overnight! Let things take their time and just focus on your effort and enjoying the ride. Acting can be an extremely exciting thing to do, so let yourself have some fun with it!
  3. All practice is good practice. Regardless of if you are focusing on a career in theater, film, or advertisement, try to be open to exploring other areas. Practice of any kind is very likely to help you in whatever entertainment area you strive to end up in. Also, all parts are important, and you will learn from any kind of involvement in entertainment. Play as that extra, help with stage lighting, direct a play at your local school or playhouse, and get involved. Not only will this help you in learning the profession and industry, but you will meet people and form connections that can be crucial in booking jobs later on in your career.
  4. Don’t feel like you fit the part? Audition anyway! This applies to jobs where you would really like to take part in the production, but personally feel you don’t look the part or fit the personality. There are multiple reasons that you should try out anyway. The biggest reason is exposure. Even if you don’t make the cut for that specific production, you have an opportunity to make a few more connections, big or small, and to leave an impression on people. Another reason would be that just because you don’t feel you fit the part for one reason or another, doesn’t mean that the casting manager or director will agree. Sometimes, other people are better at visualizing us in roles than we are for ourselves. If you feel like you couldn’t accurately portray the part, that could be an exception to this, but otherwise, just give it a shot!
  5. Change is everywhere. Things in the acting world are constantly changing. Whether it be a change in script, character, props, time, or even actors, you should always be ready for things to change.
  6. Improvisational skills are important! Along with things on set often changing, you are sometimes asked to make things up to fill in gaps or to simply add to the production somehow. When it comes to this, don’t be afraid. You will get better at this with time, and you aren’t expected to be perfect at it because no one is!

The best way to really learn about the entertainment industry is to involve yourself in it. We can all express ourselves in a positive way, and acting is that outlet for so many people. Keep all of this in mind, and you will start out ahead of the game!

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