Books

A Review Of Orion Carloto’s New Book “Flux”

Orion Carloto is a YouTuber from Atlanta who gained fame through a joint channel that she ran with a friend. Eventually, Carloto began writing on the online publication Local Wolves. There, she began to showcase her work, confessing to Twitter back in 2013 that she wanted to write a book.

 

Prior to the release announcement in September, she was teasing her followers both on Instagram and Twitter with bits and pieces of her poetry. On October 24, Carloto gifted her readers with a love letter. It takes the form within the pages of her book Flux. She lays out the basic tenants of love, heartbreak, sex and the ever-present ghost of nostalgia.

She details the woes of heartbreak with most of the poems being short and chaste (it’s the single line poems that hold resonance within the reader). She holds her own experiences and makes herself completely vulnerable in the eyes of the entire world. “A Question” whimpers out the very real hurt of an unreciprocated love.

The book reveals what everything in her life could mean and what every feeling she yearns to explore. It makes the reader think about what the book’s significance is in our buzzing world.

Carloto has written a book that wipes herself clean once more. It is as if writing this book rid her of an emotional ball and chain she had been subject to for so long. It is a clear sign of liberation for her: a freedom she decided to share with a massive world.

If there’s anything you decide to take from the book, it’s the philosophical question lingering right from the start of the book.

What does it mean to you?

Carloto doesn’t aim to answer it for the reader. Instead, she’s written a universal book that one finds themselves in. A book whose only flaw is that there are not enough pages to hold ourselves together with. Everything is worth feeling.

She’s given everyone in her world and the people living outside of it a piece of her they can hold onto. Flux is not only an amazing read but also an amazing feeling.

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