Fashion

Gen Z Yellow: Is This What We’re Supposed to Start Wearing?

The fashion gods of the world have decided, for a few months now, that Gen Z yellow is going to happen.

i-D, a fashion blog run by Vice, claims that “it is a lame unimaginative sequel. A trend riding the success of another trend.” However, the trend is already here, and has been for a while.

Kirsten Dunst holding a Millennial Pink rose in a yellow bathing suit. From @juergentellerfanpage on Instagram.

Millennial pink was the ultimate girl color, but it was imbued with a sense of revolution that let women, and people in general, use this color as the symbol for girl-power and resistance. Hayley Naham suggests in an article on Man Repeller:

The paradox which made pink so appealing […] has been all but usurped by its own ubiquity. Where’s the fun in predictability? Yellow, by contrast, offers a bright, sobering respite from the barrage of over-saccharine bubblegum.

Man Repeller basically writes an exposée on millennial pink, introducing Gen Z yellow. We can see how yellow has been popping up as far back as several months, at first subtly, mixed with pink.

Another example is this post from Kylie Jenner’s Instagram:

Kylie Jenner’s Instagram. July 7, 2017.

Felix Petty explains Gen Z yellow in an article on i-D:

Yellow is analogous with society’s outcasts and outsiders, its unwanted and persecuted, its villains and monsters. A color traditionally association with Judas Iscariot, who in Christian mythology is also considered a bit of a bad dude. In medieval Spain, they made non-Christians wear yellow. In Italy, they refer to crime stories as giallo, Italian for yellow. Yellow has had its moments though, in visual art, it was loved by Gauguin, Miro, Van Gogh, who all transformed this historically unloved color into something beautiful.

However, let’s be real. Looking good in yellow is not an easy task. Not all of us look like Beyoncé smashing cars for her album Lemonade or Kirsten Dunst chilling in a pool. Additionally, i-D brings up yellow in popular culture. Amazing, yellow moments are few and far between. Emma Watson wore a yellow dress in Beauty and the Beast. Beyoncé wore a yellow dress in “Hold Up” and wore almost exclusively gold during her grammy performance. There was also Emma Stone in La La Land, but what else?

It takes effort to look good in yellow, but it’s the color of right now (or so we’re told).

Besides, how am I supposed to pull off yellow, when more than half the tips for wearing yellow in Cosmopolitan basically say to not wear yellow by using light accessories and patterns to ease into the color? However, not everything is bad, because if there is one thing the fashion of Gen Z is known for, it is making ugly look good. Just look at Balenciaga’s sneakers and dangerous-yellow line-up. We can make anything look like fashion.

Petty adds in the same article from i-D:

Gen Z Yellow is amorphous, unstable and variable, just like kids these days.

Fall/Winter 18 was full of yellow, and it shows no signs of stopping. Just take a look and Calvin Klein’s line up for fashion week.

Calvin Klein Women’s Fall/Winter 18 collection

Calvin Klein’s Fall/Winter 18 men’s collection

Imax Tree from StyleCoaster

Man Repeller’s Naham also writes that “Gen Z yellow is the natural evolution of millennial pink.”

Image from @petrafcollins on Instagram

Image from @petrafcollins on Instagram

Lauren Adhav adds in an article from Cosmopolitan:

If millennial pink is the cool, trendy Instagram girl who carefully curates her feed by snapping pics in front of artsy graffiti walls and documenting all her lattes, Gen-Z yellow is her carefree, bold, outgoing younger sister who lives for spontaneity. She’s a little more effortless, but with this bright yellow color, she obviously still wants to be noticed.

In the words of i-D: “Try it out. Buy something yellow. It’s in. It’s now. You can do it.”

Lastly, Instyle adds:

With determination, everyone can wear yellow.

Cover Photo Courtesy of ZULA.sg.

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