Poetry

Why I Won’t Be A Nice Girl Anymore

My whole life I was always told that I was just “nice”. No one ever described me as anything but that. I was never intelligent or funny, just nice. Recently more and more people have been taking advantage of this quality, and I have had enough.

They always sad that I was a “nice girl”.

What’s a nice girl?

There are so many synonyms for the word nice, at least according to Thesaurus.com.

Admirable, attractive, considerate, friendly, and the list goes on and on.

always thought the word nice meant the same thing as kind, apparently, I was wrong.

 

I’m a nice girl who does nice things.

Like, letting someone constantly talk over me, because I know that what they have to say would probably be more intelligent.

Or help someone with their homework, even when I’d much rather be doing my own.

 

Nice girls don’t stand up to teachers, even when they know they’re right.

Nice girls don’t try to fight back, even when their life is on the line.

Nice girls don’t make their struggles heard, which is what they like about us right?

They like the nice girls with the pretty faces, who sit quietly and do their work with no resistance. They like the nice girls who smile and laugh in all the right places and are polite no matter what.

I am so sick of being a nice girl.

 

I want to resist and stand up and show them all I am more than just a nice girl.

I know that I am all of those things Thesaurus.com described,

Admirable

Gracious

Fair

Commendable.

 

But I am not nice.

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